Albert E. Holland ’34

Albert E. Holland ’34

Albert Holland came to Trinity with the class of 1934, but left the College in 1933 due to illness and financial reasons. He continued to read widely in economics and history. His expertise in German led to a position with the Institute for Business Cycle Research in Berlin. He soon began working for Brown Brothers Harriman, establishing the firm’s office in Amsterdam. In 1939, Albert returned to New York and spent the next year preparing a survey on financing the American aviation industry for Harrison, Ripley & Company.

In early 1941, Albert became assistant to the vice president of the Ossorio Companies in the Philippines and served as a junior executive with the North Negros Sugar Company in Manila. He and his family were caught up in the Japanese conquest of the Philippines in 1942 and were incarcerated for 37 months until February 1945. Albert joined the camp’s executive committee, and served in a variety of capacities working for the benefit of the internees. Upon liberation, he coordinated the repatriation of all the internees. Holland received a letter of commendation from the U.S. military for his efforts.

He returned to Trinity received his B.A. degree with honors in history and modern languages in 1946. Following graduation, he was appointed the College’s secretary of admissions and freshman advisor. Later that year, he became director of alumni relations and assistant to Trinity’s president, G. Keith Funston. He also devoted time to community philanthropy, particularly for the Greater Hartford Community Chest, the Boy Scouts of America, and the Hartford Symphony Society. In 1953, Trinity asked Holland to create a Development Office and he successfully directed the College’s first national fundraising campaign. In 1958, he was awarded the Eigenbrodt Cup, the highest Alumni honor given by the College. He became vice president of Trinity in 1959 with responsibility for admissions, alumni affairs, and development. He also earned a master’s degree in history from Trinity in 1959 and received an honorary doctor of laws degree from the College in 1966.

Albert’s reputation spread well beyond Hartford and in 1966, he became president of Hobart and William Smith Colleges. He resigned after two years and found work with the U.S. Office of Education. He then became vice president for resources at Wellesley College, a position he held until his retirement in 1977. Albert was very involved in the community and continued his philanthropic work in Boston. He died August 17, 1984 after a long illness.