Mitchell M. Merin ’75

Mitchell M. Merin ’75

For Mitch Merin, Trinity was the springboard for his future success. Merin, who came to Trinity in his sophomore year, credits the support of the faculty for his achievements in school and in business. Says Mitch, “Professor Scheuch and Professor Curran turned out to be very important influences. They guided me through the school, directed me to go to the right graduate school and really sent me on my way. So any of the successes that I have had from a business and professional standpoint I really credit to them and their very personal attention.”

Success he certainly had. He graduated from Trinity with a degree in economics, and then attended Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management. He began his career as an auditor, with Sears Roebuck as his largest client. He joined Sears in 1981, helping to create the funding structure of the new Discover Card. He later joined Dean Witter and in 1994 became their chief strategic and administrative officer where he helped coordinate the Morgan Stanley Dean Witter merger. For Mitch, a deal that big was the kind of work that kept him going. “It was absolutely groundbreaking, and at that time, one of the largest financial services mergers.” He then became president and COO of investment management until his retirement in 2005. He also served on the firm’s management committee.

Later on in his career, Mitch found time to give back to his alma mater and served as a mentor to the students, as had been done for him. He served as a career advisor and in Career Networking. He was on the Board of Fellows for two years, then served as a Trustee of the College from 2002 to 2010. He was placed on the Wall of Honor in 2001 and named a “Noteworthy Alumni in Business/Finance” in 2007. In establishing the Merin Scholarship Fund for Hartford Students, Mitch wants to help those kids who need support the most. “I want Hartford students to know they can aspire to come to Trinity, without worry about their financial resources.” He also established the Merin Family Jewish Studies Endowed Fund to help fund Jewish studies programming. In 2002, he created the Ward S. Curran Fund in honor of his former professor to support students of need and merit.